Canville Stamps Unique Wedding Favors

Wedding Planning 101
A Practical and Simple Guide to Planning a Simple, Yet Elegant Affair

Using Rubber Stamps / The Why

When planning a wedding, most brides-to-be have to consider cost. While each have different budgets and some are not as tight as others, money is usually a consideration in wedding planning. As we saw in the last chapter, costs on everything from catering to dresses can vary greatly. With so much variance in possible costs, it is wise to determine up front where the budget can be cut without sacrificing quality.

For example, as noted earlier if you decide to cut your budget in the area of photography or video taping, make sure you get a volunteer who actually knows what they’re doing. Too many brides have been dismayed to realize that Uncle Bob who offered to shoot the video didn’t know about removing the lens cover! Saving money doesn’t count if precious memories are ruined or if your special day isn’t so special afterall.

We mentioned earlier that printing is one of the largest cost factors when planning a wedding. Believe it or not, the use of rubber stamps is one way to cut out the fat without giving up the meat. When used with quality inks, rubber stamping provides high-quality printing without the high-quality price.

While it is probably not realistic to stamp bigger and more detailed items like invitations, you can combine the use of rubber stamps and your ink jet or laser printer to drastically reduce printing costs associated with a wedding. For example, you can print invitations in simple black ink while “imprinting” or “embossing” your special design and formal lines and swirls for effect. This can be done in two basic ways.

The first idea is to use invitations that actually open up. When using this type of format, simply print the text of the invitation on the inside of the invitation. Use the rubber stamp idea to create the outside of the invitation. The second type of invitation is the one that is not opened. Everything is printed on the face of the invitation card. In this instance, use your printer to print text and embellish with your rubber stamps. If your printer has high quality ink, you can even just print the invitations in simple black ink on white or ivory paper. You can probably get a great example of this by asking your mom or grandmother if she still has a copy of her wedding invitation. Older, more traditional formats were very simple black ink on beautiful white or ivory paper. And believe it or not, those simple old styles are surfacing again.

So by combining the use of your printer and rubber stamping, you can save lots of money while getting many extras...

In Louisiana, the Creoles have a special word they use: lagniappe. Lagniappe basically means something extra. It has the implication that it’s something special or good that you get for free. It’s a bonus. Rubber-stamping is great because for one price, the bride and groom get many lagniappes.

Let us explain. There are numerous materials that must be printed to prepare for a wedding. Invitations, envelopes, thank you cards, RSVP cards, napkins depending upon the size of your wedding the list can go on and on. Most brides want to have a certain amount of consistency in all of their printing. But when you begin to get into engagement party invitations, place cards, wedding party gifts and more on top of the obvious printing needs, maintaining consistency gets thrown out the window so that cost efficiency can reign. Many are not even considering consistency... they phone friends for the engagement party, have mom mail out simple handwritten invitations for the rehearsal dinner and so on just to keep the printing costs under control.

But the bride who opts to make use of rubber stamps can basically stamp everything within reason. Everything gets stamped, and the consistency looks fancy and expensive.

Once you’ve run your invitations through your printer, you can then stamp everything from napkins to envelopes for a fraction of the cost you would use to purchase these items. And keep in mind that items like napkins, placecards, blank thank-you cards, etc. can be purchased in bulk fairly inexpensively. There is really no need to write a huge check to some bridal supply house. There are much cheaper sources that you can use to reduce costs without reducing quality.

For brides who choose a religious symbol for invitations for example, can keep that cross on all printed material. Or what about the dove, the last initial, or the fancy swirls? They can be included on everything for one price.

Ideas are literally infinite. For example, the old tradition of guests saving an imprinted napkin from the special day has recently been replaced by the bride and groom giving special tokens of remembrance to each guest. A simple wooden nickel stamped with the wedding seal would be one idea of an inexpensive token. Another idea would be to tie stamped cardstock hearts to balloons. Each guest would receive a balloon to release as the bride and groom make their getaway. The possibilities are endless... so let your imagination run wild!

There is more than one reason to consider using rubber stamps in preparation for your wedding. If you want to save money, make your printing budget stretch further, have a consistent theme in all of your wedding stationary, and put a very personal touch on your wedding, you might want to read up on rubber-stamping. You’ll be surprised at how much you save and how good you look. A budget never looked this good!

Next Page: Using Rubber Stamps / The How


WEDDING PLANNING 101
INDEXTHE BIG DAYCOORDINATING THE PIECES
USING RUBBER STAMPS: WHYHOW
YOUR SEAL OF APPROVAL

WEDDING PLANNING 101
Copyright 2003 by Canville Communications
Edited by Dan C. Rinnert – Contributor: Lynda Andrews

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted, in any form or any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any informational storage or retrieval system without express written permission from the publisher.

LEGAL NOTICE: While all attempts have been made to provide effective, verifiable information in this Book, neither the Authors nor the Editor nor the Publisher assumes any responsibility for errors, inaccuracies or omissions.We do not assume any legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information contained herein.


CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE RUBBER STAMP SHOP
CLICK HERE TO VIEW OUR WEDDING STAMPS

OTHER WEDDING RESOURCES

The Master Wedding Planning Guide Practical tips to save you money and avoid unnecessary stress in preparing for your wedding day.

IDEAS for YOUR WEDDING

Marriage Vows and Wedding Vows Pre-written and time-tested vows you can use for your wedding, including tips for writing your own.

Ultimate Wedding Vow Toolkit Learn the secrets of writing amazing wedding vows that most people will never know.

Wedding Ceremonies Galore Comprehensive book of wedding ceremonies, vows and readings helps you choose the selections perfect for your wedding.

Wedding Themes and More An excellent source of unique wedding books and theme ideas to help you plan a magical wedding.

SAVE MONEY on YOUR WEDDING

Discount Wedding Guide Former wedding planner shows you how to plan an amazing wedding without spending a small fortune.

Insider’s Secrets to Planning a Wedding Bridal consultant shares tips, tricks, secrets and tools of the industry to help you plan a magical wedding!

Wedding Planning on a Budget Learn how to save thousands of dollars on the wedding of your dreams from a couple who kept their dream wedding under $2,000.

Wedding Planning Secrets Learn how you can have your fairy tale wedding on a shoestring budget.


Online since May 17, 2003. Page last updated March 1, 2009.
Canville Virtual Village is a service mark of Canville Communications. All other trade names referenced are the service marks, trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Page design by Canville Communications. Copyright 1996-2009. All rights reserved.
Illustration by Matthew Laznicka of Basement Productions. Colorization by Dan C. Rinnert.